The Winter of ’63 (aged 7½) (a poem)



“The winter of 1962–1963 (also known as The Big Freeze of 1963) was one of the coldest winters on record in the United Kingdom. Temperatures plummeted and lakes and rivers began to freeze over. In the Central England Temperature (CET) record, extending back to 1659, only the winter (defined as the months of December, January and February) of 1683–84 has been significantly colder, with 1739–40 being slightly colder than 1962–63.”


In January 1963, the sea froze for one mile.”


The Winter of ’63 (aged 7½)

Our mum, our kid asked me to ask you.
What does he want?

He wants the fire on.
Ask your father.

Shut that door.
Our dad, our kid asked―

Shut that door.
Our dad, our kid asked me to ask you.

What does he want?
He asked could we have the fire on please?

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Dad?

Ask your mother.
I’ve asked our mum.

And what did she say?
She asked me to ask you.

Why do you want the fire on?
I’m cold. Our kid’s cold.

If you’re cold, put a coat on.
I’ve got a coat on. And our kid’s got a coat on.

Then what’s your problem?
We’re still cold, our dad.

I can’t change the weather.
I know, our dad. But it’s colder inside than it is out.

Then run around the park.
The snow’s knee-deep.

Then go to bed.
It’s not bed-time. And it’s too cold to undress.

Then keep your clothes on. When you wake up, you’ll be ready for school.
It’ll still be too cold.

If there’s a problem, throw a coat over it.
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And if your brother’s got a problem, tell him to throw a coat over it.
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And if you’re still cold, rub your hands together.
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This coal needs time to defrost.
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